‘Does Party Ideology Matter After All? A Mixed Methods Approach to Studying Welfare State Change under Left and Right Government Leadership’

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When: 3 June 2015 (2-4 pm).      Where: Muirhead Tower, 710

Dr Stefan Kühner, University of York (http://stefan-kuehner.com/) will present:
Prominent works in the comparative welfare state literature argue that Left and Right government leadership ceased to matter for social policy outcomes. Yet, pooled time-series cross-section (TSCS) analyses of these claims have been limited by a bias on aggregate welfare state effort or social security generosity as the dependent variables; the operationalisation of government ideology by means of Left and Right cabinet shares; and/or the use of time-invariant veto point indices to account for different institutional contexts. This presentation employs fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fs/QCA) to test whether combinations of Left and Right government leadership, cabinet centres of ideological gravity, shifts of ideological centres and constitutional structures were necessary or sufficient conditions for welfare state change across a sample of 108 governments in 12 high-income countries between 1979-2010.

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Reflections on participatory research

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Venue: Courtyard Room, HSMC (Park House)       When: Wednesday 3rd June 2015: 1.00 – 3.00pm

The seminar will provide reflections on the experience and findings from two participatory research projects, with an opportunity to discuss the future of the participatory research theme in the College of Social Science.

Programme:

1.00: Chair’s intro and welcome: Joy Fillingham

1.05: Co-researching micro-care: Kerry Allen, Adrian Murray and Gareth Welford

1.35: Comments and questions

1.45: The right to be heard: independent mental health advocacy in England: Laura Able and Karen Newbigging

2.15: Comments and questions

2.25: Break for refreshments

2.35: Open discussion: the impact and future of participatory research in the College

3.00: Close

If you like to attend this free seminar, please contact Evelina Balandyte at e.balandyte@bham.ac.uk

Evaluating health policy reforms under the Coalition Government, 2010-2015

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When: 24 April 2015 (10am – 5pm)      Where: HSMC, University of Birmingham

Cost: £40 (per person, including lunch)    Key note speaker: Lord Philip Hunt

Despite the Conservative’s pledge in 2010 for `no more top-down re-organisations’, the Coalition reforms (2010-2015) have been described as a re-organisation you can see from space.’ These reforms have precipitated clinically-led commissioning, management cuts, and further provider competition, among others. Combined with demographic change, service developments and financial pressures, the past 5 years have been dramatic as any in the NHS history. This symposium will explore the implementation and emerging impact of these reforms, and consider future health policy under the new government.

To register and pay by debit/credit card, please use this LINK 

For any further queries please contact Bal Loyal, b.k.loyal@bham.ac.uk

IRiS Seminar: Migrant Children and the Politics of Irregular Migration

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Tuesday 20 January 2015, 12.30pm to 2pm, Room 710, 7th floor Muirhead Tower

Talk by Jacob Lind, Dr Anna Lundberg and Dr Michael Strange, Malmӧ University. Discussant: Dr Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham. 

How the experiences of undocumented migrant children and families compare in Malmo and Birmingham? Jacob Lind (currently visiting researcher at IRiS), Dr Anna Lundberg and Dr Michael Strange will present their project ‘Undocumented children’s rights claims’, a multidisciplinary study project on agency and contradictions between different levels of regulation and practice that reveals undocumented children’s human rights.

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Why we need to keep talking about gender and leadership

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Judith Smith, Director of Policy, Nuffield Trust writes for HSMC viewpoint about Why we need to keep talking about gender and leadership. The original article and other posts for HSMC viewoint can be found here.

In 1987, like generations of NHS graduate management trainees, I made my way to Harrogate for the 2-day assessment centre which determined which bright-eyed and bushy-tailed graduates were to be admitted to the national scheme.  I can still recall how surprised and impressed I was that the final appointments panel was chaired by a woman chief executive, and that she took time during the interview to talk to me about the NHS’ opportunities and support for women managers.  Bear in mind that a similar interview for the then British Rail scheme, I had been asked why ever a woman would be interested in trains, and at another for the electricity supply industry, I found myself completely surrounded by male engineers and aspirant trainees.

So do we still need to keep talking about gender and leadership almost 30 years later, or is this yesterday’s issue?  There seems to be more positive news for women where NHS management is concerned: between 60 and 70% of trainees entering the NHS graduate scheme in the past three years have been female[1], and 36%[2]of NHS Chief Executives are women.

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